What I Learned About Rice Congee

September 29th, 2014 | Mass Bytes

Autumn is one of the best seasons to spend time with our loved ones, but what I find most stimulating about it is the fact that my mother would be cooking one of my favorite foods: congee. Some of you might not be as delighted as me if this dish is served on your plate. But for me, this is one of the things I don’t want to miss during Autumn.

It is a necessity, if you may, among me and my friends to eat congee after drinking, simply because of how hot porridge running though the throat gives a sense of pleasure after you’ve had enough alcohol. My interest in this particular food doesn’t stop there, though.

Congee, apparently, not only creates that satisfying feeling of relief from a very long day, but also enhances the digestive system. This is what my half-Chinese friend told me, so I don’t think arguing with him regarding this subject will get me anywhere.

He adds that in traditional Chinese medicine, if you eat low-calorie congee, your risk of having hypertension is reduced. I’m not particularly concerned with this, maybe because I’m still in my early twenties, but this is something my dad will surely be delighted about. This food is indeed packed with some nice beneficial effects, one of which being weight loss.

I know that congee has saffron, and the benefits of saffron extract are indeed vast, but the addition of this ingredient is not entirely the reason why the dish can be a nice meal that a dieter can incorporate in his regimen.

The dish is made from rice and a lot of water. So when you eat it and feel full, it’s actually the dish tricking your mind into thinking your tummy has already been filled with an amount similar to a cup of rice, while in reality, you’ve actually ate roughly two spoonfuls. This is one of the main reasons why I love eating congee.

Hello world!

September 14th, 2014 | Mass Bytes

Welcome to WordPress. This is your first post. Edit or delete it, then start blogging!